Monday, May 19, 2008

Lyncoya, Jackson's Native Son

In 1813, the Creek Nation erupted into civil war. Many of the Creek were in favor of existing peacefully with and even assimilating into the United States. Others, led by the Red Stick tribe, sought to drive whites from their traditional lands.

The Creek Civil War ultimately became part of the larger conflict of the War of 1812. After the Red Stick sack of Fort Mims in Alabama, Andrew Jackson was ordered to deal with the Red Stick tribe. Fort Mims had provided sanctuary to hundreds of Creek on the wrong side of the war and they as well as white and black Americans were slaughtered in the attack.

Jackson drew the Red Sticks into a trap at the Battle of Talladega. It is estimated that over 400 Red Sticks died in the fight. Found among the dead was a male baby. He was taken to Andrew Jackson. Much to the surprise of everyone, Jackson decided to adopt him.

Hermitage Children has details. It notes, "In 1813, Jackson sent home an Indian child found on battlefield with his dead mother. This boy, Lyncoya, (c1811-1828) may have originally been intended as kind of a pet and companion for Andrew Junior, but Jackson soon took a strong interest in him. He was educated with Andrew Junior and Jackson had aspirations of sending him to West Point. Political circumstances made that impossible, and Lyncoya went to train as a saddle maker in Nashville. He died of tuberculosis in 1828."

Jackson does not have a good reputation as a friend of Native American rights. The Trail of Tears during his administration was a direct result of his ignoring a Supreme Court decision favoring the Cherokee. That makes it strange that President Andrew Jackson is the only American President to have actually adopted a Native American child. I guess Andrew Jackson is just a hard man to fathom.

12 comments:

aj94/horse-crazy24-7 said...

This is very interesting. One question though, did lyncoya ever have children?

Thank you for time!!!

Anonymous said...

no lyncoya didnt have children because he was only 13 when he died

Anonymous said...

Lyncoya was seventeen when he died. He was two in 1813 when Jackson recieved him as an orphan at the battle of Taladega and died in 1828. I don't know about any children.

historically blonde said...

Did Lyncoya leave us any writings, letters, or diaries that might give insight as to how he felt about his life at the Hermitage?
Did rachal Jacson mention him in any letters or diaries?
I am looking for these types of Primary Documents for research.

Anonymous said...

Think about it.
if Lyncoya was 2 when he was given to Jackson, and he died in 1828, that would make him 17 when he died. But why would he be two in 1813? He shoud have only been one.

Anonymous said...

The historical marker located where Lancoya and his mother were found (near what is now Ohatchee, Alabama) states that Lancoya was 16 when he died. He was just shy of his 17th birthday.

historically blonde said...

That is really interesting and cool. I did not know there was marker. That will be a great road trip. thanks,

Anonymous said...

The forced movement along the Trail of Tears occurred beginning in 1838; Martin Van Buren, Jackson's successor was in office.

Anonymous said...

Apparently Jackson had a second adopted Indian son as well, but finding info. on him has been a challenge.

Anonymous said...

The Jackson's second adopted son was Rachel's nephew, and not a Native American.
While there is a marker near where he was found (after Jackson's troops killed his mother)the Jackson's didn't erect a headstone for Lyncoya.I

Anonymous said...

17, do the math

Anonymous said...

Jackson was indeed the President in office when the initial "Trail of Tears" took place. The Choctaws were forced to move to Indian Territory following coerced treaties, and they moved in three waves, from 1831-1833. Of the 15,000 that were relocated, over 2,500 died along the way of disease, exposure and starvation. These waves were the original Trail of Tears, and Jackson was the President in charge of the human rights disaster.